Monday, November 16, 2009

Photography Mondays :: American Art Museum

Yesterday I went to the Smithsonian American Art Museum to see the "1934: A New Deal for Artists" exhibit for my 20th century American art history class. I've never been to that museum or the Portrait Gallery, which is in the next building. (Or I think they share the same building.) I wasn't in the best mood, but the few exhibits and pieces I did see were enough to make me come back. It's so interesting to see how different American art is from all the European works that dot the National Gallery.


Artemis.
I always thought she was supposed to be depicted with clothes, since she was chaste like Athena, but then Renoir's Diana is nude, too. Hmph, not sure.
That couple behind the statue had the cutest Yorkie puppy ever. Like him:


but cuter. If that's even possible!



The center courtyard is an atrium with killer wavy windows.



FOLK ART EXHIBIT
We had to go through it to get to the New Deal.


"Coke Covers the World" Otesia Harper, 1992 
Of course I found a quilt.



And a heart guitar with amazing embroidery. Even my Dad was like "woa!"


 "Root Monster" Miles Burkholder Carpenter, 1968



Detail of "Bottlecap Giraffe"  Artist unknown, after 1966


Detail of "Babylon, the Great, is Fallen" Robert Roberg, 1992


Detail of "Biblical Landscape with Adam and Eve"  Victor Joseph Gatto, 20th century
Of course I found the hippo, too.

1934: A NEW DEAL FOR ARTISTS
Quick history: In 1933 the Advisory Committee to the Treasury of Fine Arts started the Public Works for Art Project, because of the high rates of inspiration and the need for inspirational works of art. They received 15,663 works from 3,749 artists depicting the "American Scene."


It was separated into categories: Nature, Leisure, American People, etc.


"Black Panther" Alice Dinneen, 1934
This was one of my favorites. Guess why? ^.^


"The Farmer's Kitchen"  Ivan Albright, 1934.
The detail on this is amazing. You really have to see it in person to get the full effect of the wrinkles on her face and hands and the details of the fabrics.



"Underpass - Binghamton, New York Artist unknown, 1933 - 34
This is oil on a photograph on canvas. Pretty cool, right? Plus when we go visit my grandparents, I think we go through Binghamton.

PAUL MANSHIP
This guy's stuff was in the hallway right after. And right next to the museum store. ;]


"Crane and Peacock" 1952
The inscription reads "the crane aloft surveys the world. The earthbound peacock struts and boasts." It's from one of Aesop's fables.


"Salome" 1951


Salome was an icon of female destructiveness whose erotic dance lead to the death of St. John the Baptist.


"Preamble" Mike Wilkins, 1987
I LOVE THIS PIECE. And I never even knew it was here. Bah. Anyway, it's the preamble to the Constitution (that I've memorized thanks to School House Rock) on license plates of the fifty states, including DC.
Stupid Virginia's says "TID" :( We didn't get a cool one like NY's "LIBBER."


It wouldn't be DC without Starbucks and signs for Wombats.


I freakin love wombats. Look how cute! And fluffy! They're like small fluffy hippos.


My future car! See how it's gray so it resembles a hippo!?! :b

P.S. Update on my progress on my 101 in 1,001 list. :}


2 comments:

myklia said...

Wow!!! I love your photos and all the art. That little dog looks like a stuffed animal almost, but he/she is really cute. Looks like soo much fun.

mochaxlight said...

Ahaha, aw he does!

I <3 DC. We rock. :]